4th Grade Writing Resources

4th, Writing Resources

 

Summary Paragraph, Informational Text

Topic Sentence
Detail One
Detail Two
Detail Three
End Sentence
(sum it up, probing question, opinion…. Brings you back to the topic sentence and makes the paragraph feel complete.)

Summary Paragraph, Fictional Text

Topic sentence tells setting and main characters.
Detail One, Two, Three tells what happens in the beginning, middle and end (don’t forget the problem and how it is solved). End Sentence – give the theme or message

Narrative (Stories)

Beginning
Begin in a way that makes people want to read more.

 Hooking start
 Dialogue
 Probing question  Quotation

Introduce characters and setting
Middle
Have a moment of most excitement or a problem End
Give a sense of being complete, solve the problem

 Include dialogue
 Include Simile/Metaphor  No boring words

Writing Dialogue

When you write a dialogue follow these rules:

  • When a new person speaks, start a new paragraph.
  • Use a comma to set off the words of the speaker from the rest of the sentence.
  • Use quotation marks to set off the speaker’s exact words from the rest of the sentence.
  • Place periods and commas inside quotation marks.
  • Place an exclamation point or question mark inside the quotation marks when it punctuates the quotation.
  • Place an exclamation point or question mark outside the quotation marks when it punctuates the main sentence.
  • Once you’ve established who is speaking, you don’t have to keep writing “He said, She said…”Here’s an example:
    Mrs. Wilson said, “Dialogue is a great way to bring your writing to life.”
    “I didn’t hear you.” said the student.
    “Well, let me say it again,” Mrs. Wilson repeated. “Dialogue is a great way to bring your writing to life.”
    The student replied, “I think I need to try this for myself.”

Opinion Writing / Persuasive Writing

State your opinion
Give details that support your opinion

  • Statistics “Four out of five families that stay up all night are tired the next day.”
  • Quote an expert “Dr. Oz says children need nine hours of sleep.”
  • Anecdote “Once, when I was four years old, I stayed up to see my grandma arrive on an airplane. The next morning…”State the other opinion and knock it down. “Some say sleep isn’t important, but those people aren’t functioning correctly. They are tired.”
    Restate your opinion

    Informative/ Explanatory Essays

    Title
    Introduction that catches the reader’s attention and lets them know your topic.

     Guiding question
     Cliff hanger or foreshadow  Anecdote
     Quote
     Statistic or Factoid

    Three paragraphs with smaller topics and details that tell more about your main topic

     Simile/Metaphor

     No boring words
    Sum it Up…. Sense of being complete

Comparison Essays, Method 1

(How two things are alike and how they are different)

Start with a graphic organizer where you take notes telling how your topics are alike and different.

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Introduction Paragraph
 Topic sentence that tells the two things you will be comparing.

Detail sentences that give a little bit of information about each thing you are comparing.

 Ending sentence that tells your two things are alike and different.

Alike Paragraph
 Topic sentence tells the two things are similar in some ways  Detail one that tells how they are alike
 Detail two that tells how they are alike
 Detail three that tells how they are alike
 Ending sentence that makes the paragraph feel complete

Different Paragraph
 Topic sentence tells the two things are different in some ways

 Detail one that tells how they are different

 Detail two that tells how they are different

 Detail three that tells how they are different

 Ending sentence that makes the paragraph feel complete

Ending Paragraph
 Summary sentence that says the general similarities and differences

 Ending sentence that tells your opinion, pondering question or statement that makes things feel complete

Comparison Essays, Method Two

(How two things are alike and how they are different)

Start with a graphic organizer where you take notes telling how your topics are alike and different.

Introduction Paragraph
 Topic sentence that tells the two things you will be comparing.

 Detail sentences that give a little bit of information about each thing you are comparing.

 Ending sentence that tells your two things are alike and different.

Paragraph about topic one (for example: Western Washington)
 Tell three details about this topic, but make sure those details are details you can use for both topics (for example: natural resources, weather, landforms)

Paragraph about topic two (for example: Eastern Washington)

 Tell three details about this topic, but make sure those details are the same ones you used for topic one (for example: natural resources, weather, landforms)

Ending Paragraph
 Summary sentence that says the general similarities and differences

 Ending sentence that tells your opinion, pondering question or statement that makes things feel complete